POST 20: REFERENCES STRETCHING WITH AGE

EFFECT OF AGE

1. Range of joint movement in female dancers and nondancers aged 8 to 16 years: anatomical and clinical implication

URL: http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/34/5/814.long

In dancers, joint range of motion will increase with age, whereas it will decrease in nondancers, independent of the joint studied.

2. Does strength training inhibit gains in range of motion from flexibility training in older adults?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8531617

METHOD: Thirty-one untrained men between the ages of 50 and 74

Investigated on shoulder and hip range of motion three times per week for 10 wk.

SF training consisted of a 3-min warm-up on a stationary bike, approximately 30 min of heavy resistance strength training, and about 10 min of static stretches performed before and after each training session. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), percentage of body fat, and muscular strength (three-repetition maximum and peak isokinetic torque) were assessed before and after training for the SF group. Shoulder abduction, shoulder flexion, and hip flexion were measured with a universal goniometer in all groups before and after the training period. FO training consisted of the identical warm-up and stretching exercises used in the SF training but without strength training.

Conclusion: FO group increased its range of motion in shoulder abduction to a significantly greater extent than the SF group (P < 0.001), and none of the changes in range of motion for the SF group was significantly different than the changes in the control group.

CONCLUSION: Dancers and teachers should realize that passive joint range of motion is unlikely to improve with age. Therefore, the major goal of a dancing program should focus on exercises that retain the natural flexibility of the dancers’ joints rather than trying to improve them.

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