POST 67: BODY ECLETIC

At a time when indecision over my own pathway is inhibiting my progress in any direction, I have read a review which provided direction for dancers who are concentrated in one pathway and have no direction. Thus the reasoning behind my teaching practice. By exploring the opposing issues to my current problem I seek to find answers to questions I have previously had and if I choose the wrong pathway may never have again. Gosh I sound depressive!!!

The body eclectic: Evolving practices in dance training (review)

Kolcio K (2010) Dance Research Journal 42 (1) 96-99.

‘Teaching practices are not only skill builders- They are sites for the invention, discovery and development of dance.’ Adapted from Bales and Nettl-Fiol.

I feel this statement underpins teaching and learning. Dance teaching is more than building vocational skills it must build lifeskills too. Art and knowledge production is essential but to grow as a dance artist, lifelong skills are needed and the student may never even realise the skills have been learnt. Thus the need for clear learning objectives. Group work, collaboration, problem-solving, appreciation and critical skills all fall within the life skills and are key to a successful career.

CfE Dance focuses learns on the use of a motif.

This term was first coined by Dempster E (1995) and drives the choreography section of National curricular Dance. By interpreting the motif using structures and devices in a manner that is personal to the student, it is possibleo explor culture, personal contests, political issues, historical events and creative concepts. This provides flexibility in interpretation and links to the students other interests e.g. science, history etc.. There is a link to all teaching contexts and subjects where learners develop links in bricolage and deconstruction which augment their personal understanding and life direction.

 

Dance provides an outlet to explore concepts but is only one mechanism through which to do so and the learner must find the pathway best suited to them.

Each individual in the books discussed provide personal stories which inform, specify and contrast. The route and interpretation by each reader is independent and analysis layers infinite. In my brain  find contrasting opinions without sound evidence cloud my judgement and like clear fact to reach conclusions or provide direction.

The role of intension in the engagement in dance lessons and movement practice is therefore upmost in the experience and outcome. If students lack motivation I foster the direction. Ultimately, it is their engagement within the teaching and willingness to participate which allows successful solution. As a teacher I endlessly provide differentiation, tasks, teaching styles and account for learning styles to link with and  facilitate their process.

The experiences of others allows space for the reader to discover and develop personal policies that link with their dance practice even if they are experiencing difficulties.

A dance framework with flexibility and link to the 4 capacities of learning allows dancers to make conceptual sense of cross training to develop their body and alignment and develops cultural artistry.

All dance genre  allows dancers to improve and inform their current practice. This is why he primary curriculum Experiences and outcomes state this at all levels.

I aim to make my dancers into artists by combining life skills with experiences and contrasts in dance genre. A holistic teaching approach prevents students being passive in my classes and only learning set skills.  A dance artist takes responsibility for directing their own practice. This links the theories stated in Dancing Bodies (1997).

http://muse.jhu.edu/login?auth=0&type=summary&url=/journals/dance_research_journal/v042/42.1.kolcio.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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